Leading international food researchers convened at Aarhus University

The Department of Food Marketing at Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia and MAPP at Aarhus University have successfully hosted the 2014 International Food Marketing Research Symposium. Several leading experts in marketing and food attended the symposium.

2014.06.25 | Julia Rolsted Stacey

On 19-20 June 2014 leading researchers in the field of marketing and food gathered at Aarhus University to share knowledge and discuss challenges related to international food marketing.

The symposium is hosted by the Institute of Food Products Marketing in various locations around the world to provide a dedicated, regular forum, where academic food marketers can meet to present their research in various stages of development to advance the discipline of academic food marketing. This year the symposium took place in Aarhus and was co-hosted by MAPP.

Together Mark Lang from the Department of Food Marketing at Saint Joseph's University, Philadelphia and Klaus G. Grunert from MAPP at the Department of Business Administration at Aarhus University opened the 2014 symposium. 

Klaus G. Grunert welcomed all participants with a story about how a small country such as Denmark is actually among the world's largest pig meat exporters and produces approximately 28 million pigs annually.

“It's great to co-host a symposium that focuses on both food and marketing, and it is exciting to be part of a crowd of researchers that find both topics very interesting,” says Klaus G. Grunert.

Mark Lang added that the Institute of Food Products Marketing was proud to co-host the 2014 International Food Marketing Research Symposium together with MAPP.

Abnormally shaped food must be the result of GM

MAPP researcher Natascha Loebnitz opened the first session and gave a presentation on the effect of subjective and objective knowledge on consumer risk perception and evaluation of food shape abnormalities.

According to Natascha Loebnitz, food retailers generally do not offer abnormally shaped food.

“Food retailers expect that consumers will reject food that deviates physically from the norm,” Natascha Loebnitz explains and adds:

“A MAPP study supports the assumption that consumers prefer normally shaped foods. Actually, the consumers think that food shape abnormalities are the result of GM food production”.

The primary goal of the symposium was for the participants to discuss their research, theories and methodological approaches to food marketing.

2014 organisers

The organisers of this year's symposium were:

  • Klaus G Grunert, MAPP, Department of Business Administration, Aarhus University, Denmark
  • John Stanton, Department of Food Marketing, Saint Joseph's University, Philadelphia, US
  • Mark Lang, Department of Food Marketing, Saint Joseph's University, Philadelphia, US

Further information

Klaus G. Grunert
klg@badm.au.dk
+45 8716 5007
+45 4038 5319

See photos from the event here: day 1 and day 2. There are also photos on Facebook here.

 

 

 

Knowledge exchange